Wheaten Barn

Actually as the standard of the breed was not change, we should not be talking about “old type” nor “working type” as we do… Today’s type should be the type of the old days as well as dogs able to work by conformation. Due to their working activity, working Wheatens have a selection partly based on hunting skills. Still the conformation has to be there or they could not hunt. I don’t think it is right to assume that a working line is less worthy. To be able to hunt a Wheaten needs to have the conformation it was made for which is described in the breed standard. Now for obvious reasons, a working dog will be more muscular than a couch potato one. Usually the coat is matted or shaved and there isn’t a nice trimming to soften the general appearance. This certainly does not make working Wheatens ready for the ring. But how would they look if pets or prepared for dog shows ? And how a show dog would look if kept into kennels as a hunting dog ?
I am very much looking for keeping my puppies and Wheatens in the original type, this is my goal and I am not looking for personal preferences to make any change.

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Geragold

The quality in the Irish lines has gotten better and better, the overly shy dogs of the past are no longer commonly seen. The long and low dogs are fewer now, bites and coats are now a lot more consistent.  The movement to show them without a Terrier outline must be haunting Maureen Holmes in her grave. This is a trimmed breed.

Breeders are divided too much around the world. An Irish coated Wheaten is still at a significant disadvantage in the ring in North America, and in UK. This divide between the people who favour a heavy coat and those that favour an Irish coat has held the breed back. 

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Macfinn Ireland

In Ireland, I believe quality and construction have improved as well as coat
quality which is also much better. Ring training and presentation are very
much improved with the Breed in contention for top Group honours.

Maintaining the health and stamina of the Breed, while at the same time
remembering the origins, purpose and its working ability.

Making them more appreciated in their native country and to extend this
influence worldwide. I appreciate that there are now many breeders
throughout the world who are trying to maintain the original Irish Soft
Coated Wheaten Terrier in the way that was very dear to Maureen and know
that they struggle for recognition. Continuous education of all our native breeds is imperative.

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Brugh na Boinne

Louise Borst-Borreman  (August 2015)

When on holidays in Ireland as a child I would stay with my aunt and uncle, Barbara and Con Bradley, in Newbridge, County Kildare. They always had a Wheaten bred by Maureen Holmes (at the time I had no knowledge of that of course). From day one I fell in love with this dog. I loved the colour and the sheen of his coat and the specific touch (sensation) when going through the coat with my fingers.  Moreover Finn was a very loveable animal. So you could say I know the breed since a “yard made a coat for me” (10/12 years of age).   I just did not know they were called Wheatens!

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